11.09.17 Cornish bardic names for Gorsedh Kernow’s new bards released

Following a very successful, and for the nine new bards welcomed into the College of Bards, exciting and emotional ceremony, Gorsedh Kernow has released their Cornish bardic names.  Bards choose a bardic name in Cornish, which is generally relevant to their place of birth, their particular vocation or the work which has led them to be invited into the Gorsedh Kernow circle at their annual ceremony, held this year in the grounds of Launceston Castle.

The bardic names for Gorsedh Kernow’s nine new bards are:

Dren Rudh (Red Thorn) – Clive Boutle, London for publishing services to Cornish culture and promotion of European minority languages.

Spiser Jowan (Grocer John) – John Buckingham, Padstow for promoting Cornish identity and culture through the history of Padstow and the wider environs.

Lev Enev an Tir (Voice of the Spirit and the Land) – Jon Cleave, Port Isaac for promoting Cornish identity through song.

Maghteth an Mor (Servant of the Sea) – Dee Harris, Porkellis, Helston. By examination in the Cornish language and continuing service to Cornwall.

Mammwyn Ifarn (Grandmother from Hell) – Martine Knight, Helston for promoting the Cornish language and identity in a wide field across the community.

Fyllores Duw (God’s Fiddler) – Jakki Love, Ludgvan Churchtown, Penzance. By examination in the Cornish language and continuing service to Cornwall.

Karrek Rudh (Red Rock)  – Russell Pearce III, Orinda, California for promoting Cornish identity in the U.S.A.

Nedhores Restir (Spinner of Retire) – Wendy Simpson, Retire, Nr. Withiel, Bodmin. By examination in the Cornish language and continuing service to Cornwall.

Mab-Wynn Trengov (Trengove’s Grandson)  – Shaun Toft, Falmouth. By examination in the Cornish language and continuing service to Cornwall.

New Bards 2017 with Bardh Meur Merv Davey
New Bards 2017 with Bardh Meur Merv Davey

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04.09.17 Areth Bardh Meur Lannstevan 2es Mys Gwynngala 2017 / Grand Bard’s speech Launceston 2nd September 2017

“Kammewgh aberth yn Hwedhel Kernow” a lever Bardh Meur Kernow / “Step into Cornwall’s Story” says the Grand Bard of Cornwall

Lannstevan o pennsita a Gernow y’n oos an yurleth ha duketh ha le pur wiw rag solempnitys Gorsedh Kernow. Res yw dhyn leverel meur ras dhe Margaret Young, mer a Lannstevan ha dhe dus an dre a’ga dynnergh mar vryntin. Ynwedh ni a wor grassow bras dhe’n Kessedhek Ordena Leel ha’ga ober kales yn unn bareusi solempnita Gorsedh Kernow ha pub hwarvos oll an Esedhvos. Meur ras.

Da yw genev avel Bardh Meur a’gas dynerghi oll, gwestoryon, kanasow Kembra ha Breten Vyghan ha’n dus oll a-dro dhe’n kylgh ma, dh’agan Gorsedh Kernow omma hedhyw.

Lanson was the capital of Cornwall in the days of the Earldom and Duchy and a fitting place for the ceremonies of Gorsedh Kernow. We thank Margaret Young, Mayor of Lanson and the people of the town for their fantastic welcome. We also owe a depth of gratitude to the local organising committee and all their hard work in preparing for the Gorsedh Kernow Ceremony and all the Esedhvos events.  Meur ras.

It is my pleasure as Bardh Meur to welcome you all, guests, delegates from Wales and Brittany and all the people around the circle, to our Cornish Gorsedh here today.

Lannstevan yw an daras dhe Gernow, le mayth yw tremenyas dynnerghys yn Kernewek ha’y dhiberth a Bow Saws. Omma y wrons i metya gans chanj yn gonisogeth dell yw  diskwedhys henwyn Kernewek war arwodhyow, mappys ha satnav, gans neb leveryans koynt. Dres an nebes dydhyow eus passyes Lannstevan re beu ow kemeres plesour dre gowlwriansow gonisogeth Gernow.  Dy Yow yth esa Gool Lyvrow splann hag a dhiskwedhas ertach lyennek krev a Gernow hag a dhsikweth les heb hedhi yn dyllansow nowydh Kernewek.  An gorthugher gwaynyoryon piwosow ha kestrivians Gorsedh Kernow o arbennik yn sur. Omma yth esa genen lies gwaynyer ow kanesedhi  pub rann a wonisogeth dyblans a Gernow dhyworth fylmyow hag ilow dhe rannyeth ha’n yeth Kernewek y honen.  Res yw dhyn ni perthi kov bos an wonisogeth dyblans ma a hwrug gwaynya ragon ni Savla Kenedhlek Minoryta.

Lanson is the gateway to Cornwall, a place where a traveller is welcomed in Cornish as they leave England.  Here they meet with a change in culture as Cornish language names appear on signs, maps and satnav, with some strange pronunciation!   Over the past few days Lanson has been celebrating Cornish cultural achievements. On Thursday there was a marvellous Book Festival which demonstrated Cornwall’s strong literary heritage and highlighted the continuing interest in new Cornish publications.  The Gorsedh Kernow awards and competition winners evening was particularly special. Here we had many winners representing every part of Cornwall’s distinctive culture from films and music to dialect and the Cornish language itself.  It is important to remember that it is this distinctive culture that won us international recognition as a National Minority.   

Orth keskussulyans Gorsedh Kernow de ni a leveris meur a-dro dhe ertach Kernow ha tornyaseth. Yns i kothmans po eskerens? Ni a dhyskas fatel wrug tornyaseth treylya dres an ugens bledhen eus passyes hag a yll bos nerth rag sostena honanieth gonisogethel Kernewek. Ni a viras yn-rag orth dermyn a dheu yn le may fo tornyaseth rann skeusen erbysek moy ledan yn Kernow. Ni a gavas y hwra meur kregi war’n vaner gonisogeth a Gernow yw diskwedhys ha’n vaner kerthow kepar ha’n yeth ha hengov an werin yw devnydhys po tebeldhyghtys. Yth esa ervirans kler bos res dhe Gernow (ha’y thus autour) ha’n Gernowyon a’ga thenkys gonisogethel ha nyns yw maynys kenwerthel a-ves.

At the Gorsedh Kernow Conference yesterday we talked much about Cornwall’s heritage and tourism. Are they friends or foes?  We learned about how tourism has changed in the last twenty years and can be a force for sustaining Cornish cultural identity.  We looked towards a future where tourism is part of a much wider economic picture in Cornwall.  We found that much depends on the way Cornish culture is portrayed and the way assets such as the language and folk tradition are used or abused. There was a clear conclusion that Cornwall and the Cornish must be the author of their cultural destiny and not outside commercial interests.

Aswonvos Kernow avel le diberthys yw rann bosek a’gan istori dibarow hag ertach gonisogethel. Mar pydh prow orth gonisogeth Gernow a dornyaseth ytho yth yw res bos meur a war dastewynnya  hemma yn maner yw avonsys hag argemmynnys.   Omma, yn tiryow Kastel Lannstevan an dhadhelva a-dro dhe gowethyans Kernow gans tornyaseth gonisogethek  yw a’n jydh yn gwir.  An Gastel yw dyghtys a-lemmyn gans Ertach Pow Saws.  Aga usyans ynkressya a Gernewek war arwodhyow ha styryans a lies aga leow yw res bos keslowenhes.  Mes aga usyans heb let dhe’n garm-argemmynna fals “Kammewgh aberth yn hwedhel Pow Saws” dhe avonsya aga leow yn Kernow nyns yw mar dha. Yth yw nagh a’gan istori diblans hag aswonvos laghel avel Kenedhlek Minoryta.

 The recognition of Cornwall as a place apart is an important part of our unique history and cultural heritage.  If tourism is to benefit Cornish culture then much more care must be taken to reflect this in the way it is promoted and advertised.  Here in the grounds of Lanson Castle the debate about Cornwall’s relationship with heritage tourism is very topical. The castle is currently managed by English Heritage. Their increasing use of Cornish in the signage and interpretation of many of their sites is to be congratulated. But their continued use of the false advertising slogan “Step into England’s story” to promote their sites in Cornwall is not. It is a denial of our distinctive history and legal recognition as a national minority .

Avonsyans Kastel Dintagel gans Ertach Pow Sows avel tir-Disney Arthurek a dhisev hwedhel an oos owrek Kernow gans moy a les ha gwirvos dell yw leverys gans hendhyskonieth gwir a’n le. Ni a wormel aga usyans a’n yeth Kernewek mes Gorsedh Kernow a elow orth Ertach Pow Saws dhe dhenagha hwedhel spyrys yw herdhyes avel “Hwedhel Pow Sows” hag yn le, dhe dhiskwedhes  golowyans gwir ha leverel hwedhel gwir a Gernow.

The promotion of Tintagel Castle by English Heritage as an Arthurian Disneyland undermines the far more interesting and real story of Cornwall’s golden age told by authentic site archaeology. We applaud their use of the Cornish language but Gorsedh Kernow calls upon English Heritage to reject the fairytale that is paraded as “England’s story” and instead, show real enlightenment and tell Cornwall’s true story.

Dr Merv Davey / Telynyor an Weryn

Bardh Meur Kernow / Grand Bard of Cornwall

Lannstevan / Launceston

2nd September 2017

 

 

02.09.17 Press Release “Step Into Cornwall’s Story” says the Grand Bard of Cornwall

“Lanson is the historic capital and gateway to Cornwall, a place where a traveller is welcomed in Cornish as they leave England.  Here they meet with a change in culture as Cornish language names appear on signs, maps and satnav,” said Grand Bard Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn, in his address to fellow bards, visiting dignitaries and members of the public at Gorsedh Kernow’s annual bardic ceremony, held this year in the stunning grounds of Launceston Castle.

Bardh Meur Merv Davey Telynyor an Weryn
Bardh Meur Merv Davey Telynyor an Weryn

Thanking members of the local organising committee for all their hard work over many months and the Mayor of Launceston Cllr Margaret Young for such a warm welcome, the Grand Bard stood alongside delegates from the Welsh and Breton Gorseddau and reminded the crowds who had gathered in and around the bardic circle of the importance of recognising Cornwall as a distinct part of Great Britain.

“Launceston has a proud place in Cornwall’s story,” said Merv Davey, “with its castle built by Brian of Brittany, the Breton knight who became the first Earl of Cornwall following the Norman Conquest. Throughout the centuries the people of Cornwall have asserted their unique identity and heritage, and it is this distinctive culture that won us international recognition as a legally protected National Minority.”

Speaking of the huge effect tourism has had on Cornwall the Grand Bard emphasised that much depended on the way Cornish culture is portrayed and the way that assets such as the language and folk tradition are used or abused. He insisted that Cornwall and the Cornish must be the author of their cultural destiny and not outside commercial interests.

Bards, Heralds and Harps Launceston 2017
Bards, Heralds and Harps Launceston 2017

“We applaud their use of the Cornish language Kernewek at some of Cornwall’s heritage sites,” said the Grand Bard “but Gorsedh Kernow calls upon English Heritage to reject the fairytale that is paraded as “England’s story” and instead, show real enlightenment and tell Cornwall’s true story.”

End of press release *************************************

Gorsedh Kernow exists to maintain the national Celtic Spirit of Cornwall and to give expression to such spirit, to encourage the study of Cornish history and literature, the Cornish language, to foster Cornish art, music, dance and sport and to link with other Celtic countries.

Gorsedh Kernow was established in 1928 with the aim of celebrating and promoting Cornwall’s distinctive Celtic culture and the ancient border town of Launceston provided the setting for this year’s Gorsedh Kernow Esedhvos Festival and bardic ceremony.

The Cornish place name of Launceston, Lannstevan, means the “church or holy enclosure of St Stephen” and is derived from the former monastery at St Stephen’s, a mile and half north-west of the town and the common Brittonic place name element “Lan”.

The annual procession of bards and installation of the 9 new initiates took place on Saturday 2nd September at the ceremony in the grounds of Launceston Castle as part of the Esedhvos Festival. The procession was led by Grand Bard of Cornwall Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn, accompanied by the Mayor of Launceston Cllr Margaret Young and local Launceston girl Sophie Hillman as the “Lady of Cornwall.”

For further information about the Gorsedh Kernow Esedhvos Festival including the Bardic Ceremony please contact Delia Brotherton, Myrghwyn Melynor, Honorary Secretary, Gorsedh Kernow,  email hon.secretary@gorsedhkernow.org.uk

For more general information about the work of Gorsedh Kernow please visit our website  www.gorsedhkernow.org.uk

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23.08.17 Launceston gets ready to host the 2017 Esedhvos Festival of Cornish Culture

Launceston’s residents are busy working with bards of Gorsedh Kernow putting the finishing touches to this year’s Gorsedh Kernow Esedhvos Festival of Cornish Culture, being held in the border town of Launceston, Cornwall’s ancient capital and home to the famous 11th century castle.

Launceston Castle
Launceston Castle

The Esedhvos Festival starts on Wednesday 30th August and on Thursday 31st the programme includes a Book Festival with a new feature – “Meet the Authors” from Gorsedh Kernow’s Holyer an Gof Awards scheme.  Audience members will have a chance to listen to live interviews with prize winning authors including Judy Scrimshaw, Craig Green and Bernard Deacon. Gorsedh Kernow will also launch several new books at this event including “Cornish Bards of Launceston”, the collected biographies of living and deceased bards in the local area. The eighth in the series, this new book will document the substantial and significant contribution made by these loyal bards to Cornish heritage and culture.

Later that evening the Town Hall will host the Gorsedh Kernow Awards evening when winners will receive their Awen medals and certificates from the Grand Bard.  Displays and presentations of winners’ work will be on show from Thursday afternoon in the Otho Peter Suite of the Town Hall and all are welcome to come and look at the exhibition of work.

The one day Conference on Friday 1st September will once more tackle a thorny issue, and this year it will be exploring “Cornish Culture and Tourism – Friends or Foes?”

Grand Bard Merv Davey, Telynor an Weryn
Grand Bard Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn

“We are constantly challenged by forces that seek to diminish our unique culture and it will be very interesting to see how our audience reacts to impressive range of speakers we have secured this year,” said Grand Bard Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn, the opening speaker of what promises to be a very thought provoking day.

Among many other events in this year’s packed schedule is the much loved Troyl dance and the gala concert on the Saturday evening in Launceston Central Methodist Church with local performers and entertainers including Jane Nancarrow, Rob Strike and Launceston Town Band. On the Sunday there is a chance to try your hand at Cornish in the “Blas a Gernewek” taste of Cornish session, followed by a history walk around the town with local bard Rob Tremain, Cryor an Dre Lanstefan and a sung Evensong service in the Cornish language at St Mary Magdalene Church.

Launceston Town Band
Launceston Town Band

The centrepiece of the Esedhvos Festival of Cornish Culture will be the 2pm blue-robed bardic ceremony in the grounds of Launceston Castle on Saturday 2nd September where 9 new bards will be initiated in recognition of their outstanding work in serving Cornwall and her distinctive Celtic identity.  Entry is free and there will be plenty of space for the public to come and watch.  Stalls with Cornish themed goods will be open in the grounds from late morning and refreshments will be available all day.

Grand Bard, Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn with Deputy Grand Bard, Elizabeth Carne, Melennek
Grand Bard, Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn with Deputy Grand Bard, Elizabeth Carne, Melennek

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acknowledging the enormous amount of local help received, Grand Bard Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn, praised the efforts of all the volunteers on the Local Organising Committee.

“We are so pleased that they came forward to help us,” said Merv Davey, “everyone is so busy these days but members of the local committee understand Cornwall’s unique and distinctive culture and the importance of keeping it going.”

Esedhvos Festival of Cornish Culture, Launceston

Wednesday 30th August – Sunday 3rd September 2017 

Members of the public are very welcome to attend these events, all which are free unless otherwise stated.

Wednesday 30th August until Friday 1st September

Grand Bard's Chair
Grand Bard’s Chair

 

Grand Bard’s chair on display @ St Mary Magdalene Church, Church Street, Launceston, PL15 8AU.  Built before the Reformation in 1511 by Henry Trecarrell, its intricately carved granite exterior makes it one of the finest churches in Britain. It is open daily 10am – 4pm for visitors. Entry to the church free, but donations are welcome.

Thursday 31st August

11am – 3.00pm  Book Festival, Holyer an Gof “meet the authors” including Judy Scrimshaw, David Thorn, Rod Lyon and Bernard Deacon, plus book launches @ Launceston Town Hall, Western Road, Launceston PL15 7AR. Refreshments available, accessible for people with disabilities.  Free entry.

2.00pm onwards  Display of Gorsedh Kernow Young People’s Awards and Adults Awards & Competitions entries @ Launceston Town Hall, Otho Peter Suite.  Free entry.

 7.00pm  Presentation to winners of Young People’s Awards and Adults Awards & Competitions by Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn, Grand Bard of Cornwall @ Launceston Town Hall. With guest appearance by Jim Causley. Evening hosted by Edward Rowe, Mab Tregarrek. Bar. Free entry.

Edward "Kernow King" Rowe who will be made a bard at the St Austell ceremony
Edward Rowe, Mab Tregarrek

Friday 1st September

9.30am – 4.30pm  Conference “Cornish Culture and Tourism – Friends or Foes?” @ Launceston Town Hall. With speakers Grand Bard Merv Davey; Malcolm Bell of Visit Cornwall; Ben Gilby, Institute of Cornish Studies; Fiona Wotton, Cornwall 365; Kim Conchie from Cornwall Chamber of Commerce and Merryn Davies-Deacon. Tickets £5 to include pasty lunch from Launceston TIC tel 01566 772321.  Advance booking essential. All welcome.

 7.30pm  Cornish Troyl/Ceilidh with Carmen Hunt & Scoot Lyskerrys Collective @ Launceston Town Hall. Bar. Free entry.

Saturday 2nd September

11am  Cornish stalls open @ Launceston Castle, PL15 7DR.

 1.30pm  Procession of bards from Central Methodist Church, Launceston via Church Street and High Street through The Square to Launceston Castle.

 2.00pm  Gorsedh Kernow bardic ceremony, led by Grand Bard Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn with Miss Sophie Hillman as Lady of Cornwall @ Launceston Castle. Procession of bards returns to Central Methodist Church via Castle North Gate and Castle Street. Ceremony @ St Mary Magdalene Church if wet. All welcome.

 7.00pm  Gala Concert  @ Central Methodist Church, Castle Street, Launceston, PL15 8BA. With Jane Nancarrow reading the poetry of Charles Causley, Rob Strike and students from Launceston College, Mike O’Connor & Barbara Griggs and Launceston Town Band. Compered by Bert Biscoe, Viajor Gans Geryow. Tickets £5 from Launceston TIC tel 01566 772321. Advance booking advised.

8.30pm  ‘Come All Ye’ Cornish music and song session @ The Bell Inn, Tower St, Launceston PL15 8BQ. Hosted by Rob Strike. All welcome. Free entry.

Sunday 3rd September

9.30 – 11.30am  ‘Blas a Gernewek – A Taste of Cornish’ session @ Launceston Town Hall. Refreshments available. Free entry.

11.00am  History Walk around Launceston with bard Rob Tremain, Cryor an Dre Lanstefan, starting @ Launceston Town Hall and finishing @ The Bell Inn. Free.

 3.00pm  Choral Evensong in Cornish @ St Mary Magdalene Church, Launceston.  Collection for church funds. All welcome.

Gorsedh  Kernow Esedhvos  Festival  of Cornish Culture is supported by Launceston Town Council, Launceston Central Methodist Church, St Mary Magdalene Church, Launceston Castle, Robinson Reed Layton, The Bell Inn and many local organisations and volunteers.

Meur ras! / Many thanks!

Gorsedh Kernow exists to maintain the national Celtic Spirit of Cornwall and to give expression to such spirit, to encourage the study of Cornish history and literature, the Cornish language, to foster Cornish art, music, dance and sport and to link with other Celtic countries.

For full information about the Gorsedh Kernow Esedhvos Festival of Cornish Culture please visit the website  www.esedhvos.org.uk  or follow the link on the Gorsedh Kernow website  www.gorsedhkernow.org.uk  or contact Pat Parkins, Much Chereor, Esedhvos Events Manager, email esedhvos@gorsedhkernow.org.uk  or tel 07762 169 733

For more general information about Gorsedh Kernow please contact Delia Brotherton, Myrghwyn Melynor, Honorary Secretary, Gorsedh Kernow,

email  hon.secretary@gorsedhkernow.org.uk

14.08.17 Areth Bardh Meur Kernow, Esedhvos Kembra 2017 / Grand Bard of Cornwall’s speech, Welsh Eisteddfod 2017

Lowen of vy dos omma dhe’n Esedhvos Kembra – enor meur yw ragov vy ow honen ha rag Kernow. My a gar an solempnitys Gorsedh Kembra ha hwarvosow an Esedhvos ha’n chons dhe dhyski moy a-dro dhe’n istori ha’n ertach a Gembra. Y hwrav vy kavos didheurek hwedhel an trevesigeth Kembra yn Patagoni – ensampel a dus Keltek ow kemeres aga ertach ha’ga gonisogeth dres an norvys.

Grand Bard Merv Davey and Corolyores, Alison Davey, Welsh Eisteddfod 2017 Anglesey
Grand Bard Merv Davey and Corolyores, Alison Davey, Welsh Eisteddfod 2017 Anglesey

I am delighted to be here at the Welsh Eisteddfod, it is a great honour for me personally and for Cornwall.  I love the ceremonies of the Welsh Gorsedd, the Eisteddfod events and the opportunity to learn more about the history and heritage of Wales. I find the story of the Welsh settlement in Patagonia fascinating – an example of a Celtic people taking their heritage and culture around the world.    

Yma istori kepar ha hemma yn Kernow ha’n kemenethow balweyth hag a viajyas a-dro dhe’n bys y’n nawnsegves kansvledhen. Y’n jydh hedhyw y hyllir kavos hwath kemenethow kernewek dres an norvys oll. Mis Me my eth dhe Ostrali rag Gool Kernewek a veu synsys ena. Milyow a dus a dheuth di dhe omworra y’n wonisogeth a Gernow ha’y yeth, hy dons ha hy heginieth. My a wor bos Golyow kepar ha henna synsys dres oll an norvys gans an kemenethow broyow Keltek erel.

There is a history like this in Cornwall and the mining communities that travelled the world in the nineteenth century. Today Cornish communities can still be found throughout the world.  In May I went to Australia for the Kernewek Lowender Copper Coast Cornish Festival. Many thousands of people came there to engage in the culture of Cornwall and it’s language, dance and cuisine. I know that Festivals like this are held around the world by communities from the other Celtic countries.

Mes nyns yw “Kernow ollvysel” aswonnys gans an Governans Loundres. I a lever bos Kernow le amelek a ranndir Soth-West ha res yw dhedhi bos omjunys ganso. My a wor bos an keth tra leverys a-dro dhe’n gwlasow Keltek erel gans an governansow a Loundres ha Paris. Wel, ni a lever bos Kernow ha’n gwlasow Keltek rann an gemeneth ollvysel ha nag yw le amalek a dhenvyth!

Bardh Meur Merv Davey (Telynyor an Werin)
Bardh Meur Merv Davey (Telynyor an Werin)

But “global Cornwall” is not recognised by the London Government. They say that Cornwall is a periphery of a South West region and must be joined in with them. I am aware that much the same is said of the other Celtic nations by the governments of London and Paris. Well we say that Cornwall and the Celtic nations are part of the global community and not a peripheral place for anyone!   

Telynyor an Weryn / Merv Davey

Bardh Meur Kernow / Grand Bard of Cornwall

08.08.17 Gorsedh Kernow names 9 new Bards for 2017

A deep feeling of pride in being honoured with Cornish bardship will be plain to see this year as 9 proud initiates, 2 of whom are from outside Cornwall, wait to take their place among the 500 or so existing members of the College of Bards of Gorsedh Kernow.

Gorsedh Kernow was established in 1928 with the aim of celebrating and promoting Cornwall’s distinctive Celtic culture and the border town of Launceston, Cornwall’s ancient capital and home to the famous 11th century castle, provides the setting for this year’s Gorsedh Kernow Esedhvos Festival which includes the main bardic ceremony on Saturday 2nd September.

Launceston Castle
Launceston Castle

The high point of the ceremony, which starts at 2pm in the grounds of Launceston Castle, will be the inauguration of the 9 new bards in recognition of their outstanding work in serving Cornwall and her distinctive Celtic identity.

“Being awarded a bardship is a great honour,” said Grand Bard of Cornwall Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn “especially as the ceremony is conducted in front of all the other blue robed bards, alongside representatives of our sister Celtic nations of Wales and Brittany, other Cornish organisations and friends and families that support Gorsedh Kernow and come together on this special occasion to celebrate our precious Cornish culture.”

 

Grand Bard, Merv Davey, Telynyor an  Weryn with Deputy Grand Bard, Elizabeth Carne, Melennek
Grand Bard, Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn with Deputy Grand Bard, Elizabeth Carne, Melennek

Interest in and activity around the Cornish language, Kernewek is reflected once again in the number of people recognised this year for their work in this area.  The important world of publishing is also recognised as is the important work done for Cornwall by people overseas.

The new bards for 2017 are

Clive Boutle, London for publishing services to Cornish culture and promotion of European minority languages.

John Buckingham, Padstow for promoting Cornish identity and culture through the history of Padstow and the wider environs.

Jon Cleave, Port Isaac, for promoting Cornish identity through song.

Dee Harris, Porkellis, Helston. By examination in the Cornish language and continuing service to Cornwall.

Martine Knight, Helston, for promoting the Cornish language and identity in a wide field across the community.

Jakki Love, Ludgvan Churchtown, Penzance. By examination in the Cornish language and continuing service to Cornwall.

Russell Pearce III, Orinda, California for promoting Cornish identity in the U.S.A.

Wendy Simpson, Retire, Nr. Withiel, Bodmin. By examination in the Cornish language and continuing service to Cornwall.

Shaun Toft, Falmouth. By examination in the Cornish language and continuing service to Cornwall.

*********** end of press release

Gorsedh Kernow exists to maintain the national Celtic Spirit of Cornwall and to give expression to such spirit, to encourage the study of Cornish history and literature, the Cornish language, to foster Cornish art, music, dance and sport and to link with other Celtic countries.

The annual procession of bards and installation of the 9 new initiates into the College of Bards will take place on Saturday 2nd September at the 2pm ceremony in the grounds of Launceston Castle as part of the Esedhvos Festival of Cornish Culture. The procession will be led at 1.30pm from Launceston Central Methodist Church by Grand Bard of Cornwall Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn, accompanied by the Mayor of Launceston Cllr Margaret Young and local girl Sophie Hillman as the “Lady of Cornwall.”

The bardic names of the 9 new bards will be made known at this ceremony, which will be conducted in the Cornish language although it can be easily followed with the English translation. All are welcome to attend the ceremony and there is no charge for this event.

The Gorsedh Kernow Esedhvos Festival of Cornish Culture runs from Wednesday 30th August to Sunday 3rd  September and, as well as the main bardic ceremony, has a variety of events including a book festival, a one-day conference – “Cornish Culture & Tourism – Friends or Foes?” with guest speakers including Malcolm Bell, Fiona Wotton and Kim Conchie, the ever popular Cornish ceilidh, a gala concert, Cornish language taster morning, a “Lanson” history walk  and sung evensong in Cornish.  Most events are free of charge and all are welcome to attend.

For more information about all the Gorsedh Kernow Esedhvos Festival of Cornish Culture events visit the website  www.esedhvos.org.uk

For more information about Gorsedh Kernow please contact Delia Brotherton, Myrghwyn Melynor, Hon Secretary, Gorsedh Kernow,

email  hon.secretary@gorsedhkernow.org.uk

or visit the Gorsedh Kernow website   www.gorsedhkernow.org.uk

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1.08.17 Gorsedh Kernow congratulates successful Cornish language candidates

Gorsedh Kernow has warmly welcomed news of the results from this year’s Cornish language examinations.  KESVA – The Cornish Language Board – set up in 1967 by Gorsedh Kernow and the Federation of Old Cornwall Societies, has announced another year of impressive results from the 68 candidates who took their exams in June.

“This is more than 20% up again on last year’s number of candidates who are learning and taking exams in our precious Cornish language, Kernewek and more than a 40% rise in the number of students taking their First Grade exams,” said Grand Bard of Cornwall Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn, “ and I would like to say

Grand Bard Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn
Grand Bard Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn

‘Keslowena dhywgh hwi oll’ which means ‘Congratulations to you all’ in Cornish, you have all worked so hard.”

The results are spread across the four grades of examinations currently offered by the Cornish Language Board with the largest group of candidates based in Cornwall.

Kernewek is such a beautiful language,” said Merv Davey,     “and a very important part of Cornish culture. People are really interested in the current debate about Cornish identity and many see this as a good way to immerse themselves fully into our shared heritage. It doesn’t matter if you are Cornish born or not, it’s what is in your heart that matters and Kernewek plays a big part in many people’s lives.”

The Grand Bard expressed his gratitude to all the hardworking teachers and examiners, many of whom are bards of Gorsedh Kernow, who give a lot of their own time to help their students learn Cornish in a variety of ways including classes, self teach books and online courses.

“The Council of Europe have recognised the Cornish people and the importance of our cultural assets, such as Kernewek, under the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities ” said Merv Davey, “and once again we call on HM Government to reconsider their cuts to Cornish language funding.”

The successful candidates for 2017 are:

First Grade: Pass with Distinction

Jennifer Blockley, Launceston

Kirsty Lauder, Saltash

David Matthew, Penzance

Charlotte Morgan, Truro

Rita Nield, St Just

William Orchard, Penzance

Robin Parsons, Truro

William Pellow, Falmouth

Howard Peskett, Penzance

Tony Phillips, Penzance

Chloe Phillips, Falmouth

Kevin Steede, Gunnislake

First Grade: Pass

Colin Allen, Godalming

Tanya Brittain, Looe

Shaun Courtenay, Truro

Marie-Hélène Croizier, Ploumagoar, Brittany

Tamsin Daniel, Penzance

Nina Davey, Truro

Graham Dilley, St Ives

John Goody, Isles of Scilly

Lee Kellgren, Penryn

Emily Keverne, Redruth

David Knott, Liskeard

Brian Lindop, Newquay

Colin Loveless, Clacton-on-Sea

Robin Mackenzie, St Ives

Ian Marr, St Ives

Katrina Naomi, Penzance

Victoria Parker, Helston

Victoria Reece-Romain, Liskeard

Edward Rowe, Roche

Hannah Sharp, Saltash

Lucy Tansley, Cambridge

Nanette Tonkin, St Austell

Matthew Underwood, Plymouth

Sarah Wheldon, Callington

Second Grade: Pass with Distinction

Kensa Broadhurst, Camborne

Lisa Crosswood, Liskeard

Johanna Harvey, Crewkerne

Amanda Hilmarson-Dunn, Mevagissey

Owain Holland, Fowey

Andrew Johnson, Truro

Thomas Kadleck, Liskeard

Wella Morris, Penzance

Barbara Wyper, St Columb Major

Second Grade: Pass

Angela Bird, St Dennis

Sam Constance, Liskeard

Emma Julian, Liskeard

Yannig Laporte, Kemper, Brittany

Caroline Marwood, St Ives

Gilles Pennec, Kemper, Brittany

Shaun Rennie-Plume, Callington

Thomas Roberts, Newquay

James Williams, Calstock

Peter Wyper, St Columb Major

Third Grade: Pass with Distinction

Caroline Lane, Aylesbury

Michael Rottenbury, St Ives

Marion Smith, Carbis Bay

Sarah Smith, London

Third Grade: Pass

Phil Hurley, Calstock

Sue Lumley, Callington

Helen Pascoe, Camborne

Rebecca Sharp, Saltash

Wayne Tonkin, Redruth

Fourth Grade: Pass with Distinction

Mark Elton, London

Peter Green, Gloucester

Fourth Grade: Pass in Part

Alice Holland, Helston

Jamie Purves, Truro

***** end of press release

Gorsedh Kernow exists to maintain the national Celtic Spirit of Cornwall and to give expression to such spirit, to encourage the study of Cornish history and literature, the Cornish language Kernewek, to foster Cornish art, music, dance and sport and to link with other Celtic countries.

The revival of Gorsedh Kernow in 1928, and the commencement of church services in the Cornish language Kernewek in 1933 greatly encouraged the use of spoken Cornish and this process of familiarisation with the language was quickly followed by new plays, prose, poetry and songs in Cornish.

56 of the successful candidates of the Cornish Language Board examinations are from Cornwall, 9 are from England and 3 are from Brittany.  Several of these candidates will be presented with their certificates by the Grand Bard of Cornwall at a special Graduation ceremony in Lys Kernow (Cornwall Council Offices, Truro) later in September.

For more information about the Cornish Language Board please contact Tony Hak, Karer an Yeth, Examinations Secretary, email  apposyans@hotmail.co.uk

For more information about Gorsedh Kernow please contact Delia Brotherton, Myrghwyn Melynor, Honorary Secretary, Gorsedh Kernow,

email  hon.secretary@gorsedhkernow.org.uk

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17.07.17 Gorsedh Kernow Awards 2017 announced

GORSEDH KERNOW – The Celtic spirit of Cornwall

Press release  for immediate use issued Monday 17th July 2017

Gorsedh Kernow Awards 2017 announced

The Council of Gorsedh Kernow has announced the winners of their annual Awards and Competitions after careful consideration and review of an impressive range of entries.

“Awards are being given to entries that express the Celtic spirit of Cornwall and demonstrate exceptional endeavour or quality of work,” said Grand Bard of Cornwall Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn, “and I look forward to presenting prizes to all the winners.”

The scheme has drawn work from the creative arts, Cornish studies and the wider community creating a range of Awards and Competitions for adults and a separate range of Awards for young people under 18 years of age.

“Gorsedh Kernow Awards and Competitions are more flexible and less prescriptive these days,” said Merv Davey “and allow for entrants to demonstrate creativity in a variety of ways, including the use of digital media.”

The Awards and Competitions winners for 2017 are:

Adults Competitions

1.1 Yeth Kernewek – Cornish language

Gorsedh Kernow medals

Poem in Kernewek ‘Yn Tre Vaughan’ entered by Delia Brotherton, Myrghwyn Melynor, of St Ives.

Story in Kernewek ‘Mernans Ow Thas’ entered by Richard Howe of Porthcawl.

Gorsedh Kernow Award Certificate

Short story in Cornish for beginners entitled ‘Morvoren Lannwedhenek’ entered by Kirsty Lauder of Saltash.

1.2 Rannyeth / Cornish Dialect

Gorsedh Kernow Medals

‘The Man Who Blawed the Organ’ entered by John Jenkin, Carrek an Jawl of Bodmin.

‘Taint all Poldark and Pasties’ entered by Mo Keast, Myrgh Cana Hengovek of Bodmin.

‘Jan Treskillard’ entered by Jill Thomas, Myrgh Elerghi of Liskeard.

1.3 Studhyansow Kernewek/ Cornish Studies

Gorsedh Kernow Medal

Ranyeth Lulyn’ entered by John Jenkin, Carrek an Jawl of Bodmin.

Gorsedh Kernow Award Certificate

Cornish Survey from John Ellery Gillingham of Camborne.

1.4 Skeusenieth / Photography

Gorsedh Kernow Medal

6 Images entered by Sally Mitchell of Mevagissey.

Adults Awards

2  Awenekter / Creativity

Gorsedh Kernow Medals

Comic book style story ‘Men an Tol’ written and entered by Joanna Veranda based at Tremough Campus and illustrated by Tania A Cardoso based in Rotterdam.

Story ‘Diaspora’ by Heather Hosking of Redruth.

Song in English ‘One and All’ by Helen Bartrop Hocking of Pancrasweek, Exeter.

Verse ‘Pendeen’ by Chris Nancollas of Yorkley, Gloucestershire.

Paintings ‘Rural Scene at Lanyon’ and ‘Men an Tol’ from William Morris, Haldreyn of London.

Carving ‘Mermaid’ set on slate from Paul Benney of Newquay.

The Mike Hartland Award for work which engages people in Cornish culture – CD ‘The Clay Hymnal’  by Jim Causley of East Devon & Luke Thompson of Mevagissey.

The Glenda Hartland Award  for film – ‘The Poet’ by Jane Darke of Padstow and Andrew Tebbs of Nottinghamshire.

The Glenda Hartland Award for design –

Textile work by Maddie McColin based at Falmouth University, Tremough Campus.

3  Kemeneth / Community

Outstanding community service for Cornwall

Gorsedh Kernow Medals

Tassy Swallow, Morvoren Mordonnow of St Ives for SurfRatz, The Island, St Ives.

Anne & Keven Ayres of Falmouth for The Cornish Store, Falmouth.

Golden Tree, to be received by Will Coleman, Pednithan of St Buryan.

The Radyo an Gernewegva Award for raising fluency in the community – Esther Johns, Tamm Steren of Mullion for Skol Veythrin.

London Cornish Association Pewas Map Trevethan / Paul Smales Medal 2017 for services to Cornwall by someone living outside Cornwall – Mrs Del Clinton (Cornish Association of New South Wales) of New South Wales, Australia.

 London Cornish Association Shield 2017  for outstanding services to Cornwall and Cornish people –  Mrs Anne Parsons (Bournemouth Cornish Association) of Poole, Dorset.

Young People’s Awards

1  Yeth Kernewek / Cornish Language

First:  Amelia Dale, age 7, Cusgarne School, Truro – ‘Why I love Cornwall’.

Second:  Lauren Luscombe, age 8, Cusgarne  School – ‘Spladn che Steren’.

Third:  Spencer Judd, age 7, Cusgarne School – ‘My Family’.

Special category – Poetry/ Verse/Creative Writing

Ages 5 – 7

Freddie Judd, age 5, Cusgarne School – ‘My Dad was a Cornish Fisherman’.

 Ages: 11-12

Evie Luckhurst, age 12, St Ives School – Poem ‘Marhas-Vian’.

Ages 13-14

First:  Aiden Drew, age 14 Poltair School, St Austell – ‘Wheal Martyn’.

Second:  Aaliyah E Ro-Pi, age 14, Poltair School – ‘The Lapse of Time’.

 Ilow Kernewek / Cornish Music

First:  St Maddern’s School, Madron, Penzance – ‘Teyr Gwydhenn Arbennik’ .

Second:  Truro Preparatory School – ‘Kana Dhymm’.

5  Studhyans Kernewek / Cornish Studies

To be announced

6  Art & Design

Special Award for Poltair School for ‘Paper Porcelain Pieces’ relating to study of ceramics at Wheal Martyn, jointly won by: Kenneth Bicoy, Lydia Ellis, Bethany Burt, Emily Evely, Jessica Frost, Emily Head, Aiden Kitts, Aaliyah Robinson-Rickford, Kelsey Vanderplank.

Age 4 and under

Sophie Duloy, age 4, Cusgarne School – ‘Man Engine’.

Ages 5-7

First:  Isabelle Waters, age 6, Cusgarne School – ‘Pocketbook of Folklore Legends’.

Second:  Harrison Childs, age 7, Cusgarne School – ‘Wheal Prosper’.

Ages 8 – 11

First:  Ruan Michael Crooks, age 10, Cusgarne  School – ‘Tin Mine’.

Second:  Imogen Barnard, age 9, Cusgarne School – ‘St Michael’s Mount’.

Third:  Rebecca Chellamuthu, age 10, Cusgarne School – ‘Mysterious Sea’.

End of press release *****************************

The Gorsedh Kernow Awards and Competitions 2017 scheme enables Gorsedh Kernow to recognise and celebrate a wide range of Cornish cultural activity alongside the more traditional arts and literary entries and allows for entries to be submitted through new media technologies.

Awards for young people were open to all schools, young people’s and children’s organisations and individuals under the age of 18 and were considered in one of three age groups – under 7 years of age, 8 to 11 and 12 to 17.

Displays and video presentations from several of the Awards winners will be available for viewing from 2pm onwards on Thursday 31st August in Launceston Town Hall Otho Peter Room. Entry is free.

The Awards Presentation evening, part of the Gorsedh Kernow Esedhvos Festival of Cornish Culture, will take place at 7pm on Thursday 31st August at Launceston Town Hall and will be hosted by bard Edward Rowe, Mab Tregarrek.  Entry is free and all are welcome to attend.

For further information about and a full programme for the Gorsedh Kernow Esedhvos Festival of Cornish Culture please visit our website http://gorsedhkernow.org.uk/esedhvos.html

For general information about Gorsedh Kernow please contact Delia Brotherton, Myrghwyn Melynor, Hon Secretary, Gorsedh Kernow,

email  communications@gorsedhkernow.org.uk

or visit our website www.gorsedhkernow.org.uk

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12.07.17 Holyer an Gof 2017 Awards winners announced

Gorsedh Kernow has announced the winners of the annual Holyer an Gof competition at a prestigious Awards ceremony held on Tuesday 11th July, hosted by Waterstones of Truro with special guest mc Edward Rowe, Mab Tregarrek fronting the 21st year of these popular Awards.

2017 Winners Holyer an Gof Awards with Bardh Meur

Established and organised by Gorsedh Kernow to raise the standard and profile of publishing in Cornwall, this year’s winners were once again chosen from the best, recently published books about Cornwall or in Cornish.

“Although the number of entries is slightly down again this year, probably because books are now entered in one class rather than multiple classes, the quality of writing, illustrating and publishing, especially in the young adults category, is better than ever,” said Holyer an Gof co-organiser Rael Harvey, Myrgh Mydroilyn “and our wonderful panel of readers, drawn from the Gorsedh Kernow College of Bards and others with expertise and knowledge of their particular subject, have once again done a great job.”

Holyer an Gof has become a model for Cornish awards and Gorsedh Kernow continues to encourage new publications about Cornwall and the Cornish language.

“We are so pleased to win this Award,” said Craig Green, winning author of ‘A Christmas in Cornwall’ in the children’s books class and published by Mabecron Books.

Bardh Meur with Ron Johns (Publisher) and Craig Green (Author)
Bardh Meur with Ron Johns (Publisher) and Craig Green (Author)

“We put so much love into this because we wanted the perfect Christmas book for children and we also applaud Gorsedh Kernow and the Holyer an Gof Awards for championing Cornish language books,” said Craig.

Winners in class and also the Holyer an Gof Trophy, David and Stuart Thorn, were delighted with their win, saying that family were central to their success.

Bardh Meur with Stuart and David Thorn
Bardh Meur with Stuart and David Thorn

“Our relatives are the real stars of this book,” said David Thorn accepting the Award alongside his cousin Stuart Thorn, “I don’t think anyone had ever taken photographs in Bude before!”

“We are very proud of the Holyer an Gof competition and we are very grateful to Waterstones in Truro who very kindly host our Awards evening each year and to Kresen Kernow Cornish Studies Library in Redruth who provide administrative help and meeting space for our reader reviewers,” said Grand Bard of Cornwall Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn, who presented certificates and cups to the winners on the night.

The winners of the 2017 Gorsedh Kernow Holyer an Gof Awards are:

1.0 – Cornish language books for teaching

A Learners’ Cornish Dictionary in the Standard Written Form, edited by Steve Harris, published by Ors Sempel & An Kylgh Kernewek.

1.1 – Cornish language books for children

There were no entries in this class.

1.2 – Cornish language books for adults

Tenkys by Rod Lyon, published by Kesva an Taves Kernewek.

Winner of the Kowethas an Yeth Cup for authorship or translation from Class 1

Tenkys by Rod Lyon, published by Kesva an Taves Kernewek.

Classes 2.0 & 2.1 – Books for children of primary age and books for young adults

A Christmas in Cornwall  by Craig Green and Oliver Hurst, published by Mabecron Books.

Winner of the Gorsedh Kernow Ann Trevenen Jenkin Cup

The Little Red Egg by Judy Scrimshaw, published by Granny Moff Books.

Class 3 – Adult Fiction

Broken Dove by L A Kent, published by WillowOrchard Publishing.

Combined Classes 4 – Poetry and 4.1 – Drama

There were no nominations in this class.

Class 5 – Non Fiction – History, Language and Creative Arts

Cornwall’s First Golden Age by Bernard Deacon, published by Francis Boutle Publishers.

Combined Classes 5.1 – Non Fiction – Marine, Industrial Heritage and Environment and Class 5.2 – Non Fiction in which illustrations predominate

Tommy Morrissey : Fisherman Painter by Gill Scott, published by Spur Valerian Press.

Class 6 – Booklets

Changing Places : Porthcurno and the Roots of Modern Communication by Steve Bladon, Rosalyn Goulding and others, published by PK Trust.

The winner of the Literary Salver, chosen by members of the Cornish Literary Guild, was Scryfer : Robert Victor Walling 1895-1976 – Bard and Journalist by Ann Trevenen Jenkin and Stephen Gadd, published by Gorsedh Kernow and Kesva an Taves Kernewek.

The Holyer an Gof Trophy, for the most outstanding entry in the whole competition, was awarded to Thorn’s of Bude by David Thorn and Stuart Thorn, published by Halsgrove.

End of Press Release

**********************************

The Holyer an Gof Publishers’ Awards are promoted annually by Gorsedh Kernow for publications relating to Cornwall or the Cornish Language and were launched in 1996 in memory of Redruth Publisher and Bard of the Cornish Gorsedh, Leonard Truran, whose bardic name was Holyer an Gof – Follower of The Smith.

The awards were established and organised by members of Gorsedh Kernow to raise the standard and profile of publishing in Cornwall.

The panel of reader reviewers mainly comprises members of the Gorsedh Kernow College of Bards and others with particular expertise.

Details of all the entries for 2017 can be found on the Holyer an Gof website www.holyerangofawards.org.uk

For photos of 2017 book covers see http://www.holyerangofawards.org.uk/publications_nominated_2017.html

The Holyer an Gof Trophy, presented by the late Joan Truran, is perpetual and awarded for the most outstanding entry in the whole competition.

In addition to the Holyer an Gof Trophy, the Cornish Literary Guild presented a second perpetual award, The Literary Salver, to an author of their choice. Nominations for this award are made by the panel of readers and a winner is chosen by members of the Cornish Literary Guild.

Winning entries in each category were announced and prizes awarded at a special Presentation evening on Tuesday 11th July at Waterstones in Truro, with each category winner receiving a certificate from  Gorsedh Kernow. The winner of the Holyer an Gof Trophy also received a £100 donation to the Cornish charity of their choice.

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19.06.17 Press release – Nominations announced for 2017 Holyer an Gof Awards

Gorsedh Kernow’s hard working band of loyal reader reviewers has been keeping the organising committee busy once more with over 200 reports submitted for the much anticipated annual Holyer an Gof Publishers’ Awards, now in its 21st year.

“Although the number of entries is slightly down again this year, probably because books are now entered in one class rather than multiple classes, the quality of writing, illustrating and publishing, especially in the young adults category, is better than ever,” said Holyer an Gof co-organiser Rael Harvey, Myrgh Mydroilyn.

“The Gorsedh Kernow Holyer an Gof Awards continue to attract entries from all round the publishing world.  We are particularly pleased to see entries coming in from the hard to reach self publishing sector.”

Holyer an Gof 2016 winners
Holyer an Gof 2016 winners

Promoted annually by Gorsedh Kernow for publications relating to Cornwall or the Cornish language, Holyer An Gof has become a model for Cornish awards and Gorsedh Kernow is very pleased to encourage all supporters of Cornish publishing.

“These Awards have become an important and much-anticipated annual event,” said Grand Bard Merv Davey, Telynyor an Weryn, “and I am grateful to all the readers who give up their time to carefully review all the entries.”

“The range of nominees this year, announced today, reflects the immense interest in Cornwall’s unique culture, especially our history and creative arts and

we look forward immensely to announcing the winners and celebrating 21 years of the Holyer an Gof Awards at our prestigious ceremony in July at Waterstones of Truro.”

The nominations for the 2017 Gorsedh Kernow Holyer an Gof annual Awards are:

Class 1.0 – Cornish language books for teaching

A Learners’ Cornish Dictionary in the Standard Written Form, edited by Steve Harris, published by Ors Sempel & An Kylgh Kernewek.

Taves an Tir Resource Pack for Schools, edited by Pat Parry, published by Kowethas an Yeth Kernewek.

Class 1.1 – Cornish language books for children

There were no entries in this class.

Class 1.2 – Cornish language books for adults

An Kevreyth Howlek by Rod Lyon, published by Kesva an Taves Kernewek.

Tenkys by Rod Lyon, published by Kesva an Taves Kernewek.

Combined Classes 2.0 & 2.1 – Books for children of primary age and books for young adults

A Christmas in Cornwall  by Craig Green and Oliver Hurst, published by Mabecron Books.

The Fortune of the Seventh Stone by Petrus Ursem, self published by Gresham House Studios.

The Little Red Egg by Judy Scrimshaw, published by Granny Moff Books.

The Solstice Blade by Robert Beck, self published by Mandolin Press.

Class 3 – Adult Fiction

A Cord of Three Strands by S J Haxton, published by Boswell Book Publishing.

Broken Dove by L A Kent, published by WillowOrchard Publishing.

Buried in the Country by Carole Dunn, published by Little Brown Book Group; Constable imprint.

What Everybody is Saying by Carla Vermaat, published by Carmichael Publishers.

Combined Classes 4 – Poetry and 4.1 – Drama

There were no nominations in this class.

Class 5 – Non Fiction – History, Language and Creative Arts

A Fight for Life by Ingo Kuster, published by P & B Hawkey.

Cornish Solidarity : Using Culture to Strengthen Communities by Neil Kennedy, published by Evertype.

Cornwall’s First Golden Age by Bernard Deacon, published by Francis Boutle Publishers.

 

Marconi : The Man Who networked the World by Marc Raboy, published by Oxford University Press.

Scryfer : Robert Victor Walling 1895-1976 – Bard and Journalist by Ann Trevenen Jenkin and Stephen Gadd, published by Gorsedh Kernow and Kesva an Taves Kernewek.

The Cornish in Latin America by Dr S P Schwartz, published by Cornubian Press.

 Combined Classes 5.1 – Non Fiction – Marine, Industrial Heritage and Environment and Class 5.2 – Non Fiction in which illustrations predominate

Cornwall’s Fuse Works 1831-1961 by Diane Hodnett, published by The Trevithick Society.

Sea Journal by Lisa Woollett, published by Zart Books.

Thorn’s of Bude by David Thorn and Stuart Thorn, published by Halsgrove.

Tommy Morrissey : Fisherman Painter by Gill Scott, published by Spur Valerian Press.

Class 6 – Booklets

Changing Places : Porthcurno and the Roots of Modern Communication by Steve Bladon, Rosalyn Goulding and others, published by PK Trust.

Cornish Bards of Australia and New Zealand compiled by Gorsedh Kernow Archives and Publications, published by Gorsedh Kernow.

The Cornish History Notebook by Dee Harris, published by Ors Sempel & An Kylgh Kernewek.

End of Press Release

*****************

For further information about the Gorsedh Kernow Holyer an Gof Publishers’ Awards please contact Rael Harvey, Myrgh Mydroilyn,

email  enquiries@holyerangofawards.org.uk

For general information about Gorsedh Kernow please contact Delia Brotherton, Myrghwyn Melynor, Gorsedh Kernow Communications Officer,

email  communications@gorsedhkernow.org.uk

The Holyer an Gof Publishers’ Awards are promoted annually by Gorsedh Kernow for publications relating to Cornwall or the Cornish Language and were launched in 1996 in memory of Redruth Publisher and Bard of the Cornish Gorsedh, Leonard Truran, whose bardic name was Holyer an Gof – Follower of The Smith.

The awards were established and organised by members of Gorsedh Kernow to raise the standard and profile of publishing in Cornwall.

The panel of reader reviewers mainly comprises members of the Gorsedh Kernow College of Bards and others with particular expertise.

Details of all the entries for 2017 can be found on the Holyer an Gof website www.holyerangofawards.org.uk

For photos of 2017 book covers see http://www.holyerangofawards.org.uk/publications_nominated_2017.html

Winning entries in each category will be announced and prizes awarded at a special Presentation evening at Waterstones in Truro. Each nominee will receive a Gorsedh Kernow certificate.  In addition there will be four Awards made during the presentation evening;

The Kowethas an Yeth Kernewek Cup – awarded for the best original work or translation into Cornish (Kernewek).

The Gorsedh Kernow Ann Trevenen Jenkin Cup – awarded for authorship in the class for children and young adults.

The Holyer an Gof Trophy, donated by the late Joan Truran, awarded to the publication which, in the judgement of the reader reviewers, is the most outstanding entry in the whole competition.

The Cornish Literary Guild Literary Salver, presented to an author of their choice. Nominations for this award are made by the panel of readers and a winner is chosen by members of the Cornish Literary Guild.

The winner of the Holyer an Gof Trophy will also receive a £100 donation to the Cornish charity of their choice.

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